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Posted by: Raymond McDougall on 01.21.2020 | Filed under: Latest, Recent Mineral Updates | Comments (0)

 

I’ve posted the fourth in a series of updates with superb specimens from John S. White’s collection (click here).

Most of you will likely know a bit about John, given that among his many accomplishments in the mineral world he is the founder of the Mineralogical Record, former curator of the U.S. National Mineral and Gem Collection at the Smithsonian Institution and author of two books and over 200 articles. I’ve written a short post about him with some great photos – hope you enjoy it! (click here) .

Spodumene, var. Kunzite, Urucum Mine, Galileia, Minas Gerais, Brazil

Spodumene, var. Kunzite, Urucum Mine, Galileia, Minas Gerais, Brazil – 7.7 cm

Stibnite and Calcite, Tongren Prefecture, Guizhou, China

Stibnite and Calcite, Tongren Prefecture, Guizhou, China – 6.5 cm

Elbaite Tourmaline, Albite, Stak Nala, Gilgit-Skardu Road, Northern Areas, Pakistan

Elbaite Tourmaline, Albite, Stak Nala, Gilgit-Skardu Road, Northern Areas, Pakistan
Field of view 5.0 cm

Prehnite, Calcite, Upper New Street Quarry, Paterson, Passaic Co., New Jersey, USA

Prehnite, Calcite, Upper New Street Quarry, Paterson, Passaic Co., New Jersey, US – 9.8 cm

Prehnite, Merelani Hills, Lelatima Mountains, Manyara, Tanzania

Prehnite, Merelani Hills, Lelatima Mountains, Manyara, Tanzania – 5.0 cm

Prehnite, Merelani Hills, Lelatima Mountains, Manyara, Tanzania

Prehnite, Merelani Hills, Lelatima Mountains, Manyara, Tanzania – 3.6 cm

Rutile and Hematite in Quartz, Novo Horizonte, Bahia, Brazil

Rutile epitactic on hematite in quartz, Novo Horizonte, Bahia, Brazil
Field of view 1.6 cm

Spessartine Garnet, Quartz. Tongbei, Yunxiao Co., Fujian Province, China

Spessartine Garnet with smoky quartz and opal, Tongbei, Yunxiao Co., Fujian Province, China
Field of view 4.0 cm

Sphalerite, Quartz, Madan Ore Field, Rhodope Mountains, Smolyan Oblast, Bulgaria

Sphalerite with quartz, Madan Ore Field, Rhodope Mountains, Smolyan Oblast, Bulgaria
Field of view  5.0 cm
Stellerite, Maharashtra, India

Stellerite, Maharashtra, India – 7.7 cm

Vanadinite, Mibladen Mining District, Midelt, Khenifra, MoroccoVanadinite, Mibladen Mining District, Midelt, Khenifra, Morocco – 4.4 cm

Jeffrey Mine, Asbestos, Estrie, Quebec, Canada

 Jeffrey Mine, Asbestos, Estrie, Quebec, Canada

Wulfenite, Ahumada Mine, Los Lamentos Mtns., Chihuahua, Mexico

Wulfenite, Ahumada Mine, Los Lamentos Mtns., Chihuahua, Mexico – 8.5 cm

Wurtzite, epitactic Sphalerite, Merelani Hills, Lelatima Mountains, Manyara, Tanzania

Wurtzite, epitactic Sphalerite, Merelani Hills, Lelatima Mountains, Manyara, Tanzania – 1.6 cm

Posted by: Raymond McDougall on 11.18.2019 | Filed under: Latest | Comments (0)

 

This is the first of two Nova Scotia posts – I’ve added some excellent Wasson’s Bluff specimens in this Red Chabazite Update (click here).

In one relatively small zone at Wasson’s Bluff, the chabazite crystals are a particular dark red hue – more intense and lighter than a brown, and most are a bit deeper and darker than a brick red or deep orange. This zone has produced sporadically over history. Most often, days of very hard work in this area yield absolutely nothing, but a few isolated finds in recent years have produced a small number of excellent pieces – these specimens are from those finds. There have been no finds from this zone since 2017. The zone of interest is largely now gone and there has been no sign of continuing pockets or mineralization.

In historic times, these particular deep-coloured chabazites from Wasson’s Bluff were known as “acadialite”, named for Acadia (which is the English for L’Acadie, the colonial-era name for this part of Canada). The name “acadialite” is sometimes still seen on older collection labels, sometimes as a species name and sometimes as a varietal name. Under current nomenclature, these specimens are known as chabazite, with “acadialite” now considered a historical synonym.

Chabazite, Wasson's Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, CanadaChabazite, Wasson’s Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada – 5.2 cm

Chabazite, Wasson's Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Chabazite, Wasson’s Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada
Field of view 2.5 cm

Chabazite, Wasson's Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Chabazite with heulandite, Wasson’s Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada – 5.9 cm

Chabazite, Wasson's Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Chabazite, Wasson’s Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada – 4.0 cm

Chabazite, Wasson's Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Chabazite with heulandite, Wasson’s Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada – 6.7  cm

Chabazite, Wasson's Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Chabazite, Wasson’s Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada – 6.6 cm

Chabazite, Wasson's Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Chabazite, Wasson’s Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada – 7.8 cm

Chabazite, Wasson's Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Chabazite, Wasson’s Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada – 8.2 cm

Chabazite, Wasson's Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Chabazite with heulandite, Wasson’s Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada
Field of view 2.5 cm

Chabazite, Wasson's Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Chabazite, Wasson’s Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada
Field of view 2.8 cm

Chabazite, Wasson's Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Chabazite, Wasson’s Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada
Field of view 6.0 cm

Chabazite, Wasson's Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Chabazite, Wasson’s Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada
Field of view 2.2 cm

Posted by: Raymond McDougall on 10.30.2019 | Filed under: Latest, Recent Mineral Updates | Comments (0)


I’ve posted beautiful new natrolite specimens in this Mont Saint-Hilaire Update (click here). These are from a relatively recent pocket – they are great crystals with sharp, glassy pyramid faces and they fluoresce bright green under short-wave ultraviolet light.

These are pairs of photos of specimens, (1) in normal lighting and (2) under short-wave ultraviolet light.

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite (fluorescent), Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 5.9 cm

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 7.6cm

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 10.9 cm

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 7.3 cm

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 4.5 cm

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 7.6 cm

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 6.8 cm

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 5.5 cm

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 5.2 cm

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 6.0 cm

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 6.7 cm

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 3.5 cm

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 6.1 cm

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 5.1 cm

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 6.4 cm

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 4.7 cm

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 4.3 cm

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 3.8 cm

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 4.7 cm

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Natrolite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 3.2 cm

Posted by: Raymond McDougall on 10.05.2019 | Filed under: Latest, Recent Mineral Updates | Comments (0)

I’ve posted the third in a series of updates with superb specimens from John S. White’s collection (click here). This update includes some interesting specimens of quartz, one to the areas in which John has specialized.

Most of you will likely know a bit about John, given that among his many accomplishments in the mineral world he is the founder of the Mineralogical Record, former curator of the U.S. National Mineral and Gem Collection at the Smithsonian Institution and author of two books and over 200 articles. I’ve written a short post about him with some great photos – hope you enjoy it! (click here) .

Quartz, Jinkouhe District, Leshan, Sichuan, ChinaQuartz, Jinkouhe District, Leshan, Sichuan, China – 7.8 cm

Quartz, Mount Malosa, Zomba District, Malawi

Quartz, Mount Malosa, Zomba District, Malawi – 4.4 cm

Quartz, Linopolis, Minas Gerais, Brazil

Quartz, Linopolis, Minas Gerais, Brazil – 8.4 cm

Quartz, Japan Law Twin, Pampa Blanca District, Huancavelica Dept., Peru

Quartz, Japan Law Twin, Pampa Blanca District, Huancavelica Dept., Peru – 5.0 cm

Quartz PS Apophyllite, Summer Storm Claim, Custer Co., Idaho, USA

Quartz pseudomorph after Apophyllite, Summer Storm Claim, Custer Co., Idaho, USA

Quartz PS Apophyllite, Summer Storm Claim, Custer Co., Idaho, USA

Quartz epimorph after Apophyllite, Summer Storm Claim, Custer Co., Idaho, USA

Quartz epimorph after Calcite, Dayu Co., Jiangxi, China

Quartz epimorph after Calcite, Dayu Co., Jiangxi, China

Quartz, Clinochlore inclusions, Tipling Mine, Ganesh Himal, Dhading District, Province No. 3, Nepal

Quartz, Clinochlore inclusions, Tipling Mine, Ganesh Himal, Dhading District, Province No. 3, Nepal – 4.6 cm

Quartz, Dolomite Inclusions, Fisher Mountain, Montgomery Co., Arkansas, USA

Quartz, Dolomite Inclusions, Fisher Mountain, Montgomery Co., Arkansas, USA – 9.1 cm

Quartz, Phantom, Hog Jaw Mine, Montgomery Co., Arkansas, USA

Quartz with phantom, Hog Jaw Mine, Montgomery Co., Arkansas, USA – 3.6 cm

Quartz, var. Amethyst, Diamond Willow Mine, McTavish Twp., Thunder Bay District, Ontario, Canada

Quartz, var. Amethyst, Diamond Willow Mine, McTavish Twp., Thunder Bay District, Ontario, Canada – 7.1 cm

200088(1)(6.5)

Quartz var. Amethyst, Piedra Parada, Mun. de Tatatila, Veracruz, Mexico – 6.5 cm

Quartz, var. Amethyst, Jacksons Crossroads, Wilkes Co., Georgia, USA

Quartz, var. Amethyst, Jacksons Crossroads, Wilkes Co., Georgia, USA – 5.8 cm

I was afraid that even short term treatment would develop addiction to Klonopin Online. They state on xanaxbest.com that it may develop only if there is big dosing and if it is not short-term. But in general it there many controversial statements over the web. As for me, I had no addiction left at all after it. I suggest all is good in small controllable doses prescribed by your doctor.

Quartz, var. Amethyst, Cristobalite inclusion, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

Quartz, var. Amethyst, Cristobalite inclusion, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil – 5.6 cm

Posted by: Raymond McDougall on 10.18.2017 | Filed under: Latest, Recent Mineral Updates | Comments (0)

 

I’ve added excellent new specimens from Cape Split in this Nova Scotia Update (click here).

Cape Split is on the Blomidon Peninsula – “Blomidon” is best known among mineral people as a classic locality for analcime. Over the past three years, a pocket system at Cape Split has sporadically yielded excellent, distinctive specimens of several minerals, most notably the groups and hemispheres (and even balls) of natrolite crystals, associated with sharp analcime crystals, and lustrous brownish stilbite crystals. This pocket system seems to be at an end, and this group of specimens represents some of the nicest pieces recovered from these finds.

Natrolite with Analcime, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Natrolite with Analcime, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada – 8.4 cm

Natrolite with Stilbite, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Natrolite with Stilbite, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada – 9.5 cm

Natrolite with Analcime, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Natrolite with Analcime, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada – 6.1 cm

Natrolite with Calcite, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Natrolite with Calcite, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada – 6.8 cm

Natrolite with Analcime, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Natrolite with Analcime, Stilbite and Heulandite – 8.3 cm
Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Natrolite, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Natrolite, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada
Field of view 4.5 cm

Natrolite, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Natrolite, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada
Field of view 4.5 cm

Natrolite with Analcime, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Natrolite with Analcime, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada
Field of view – 3.0 cm

Analcime with Stilbite on Heulandite, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Analcime with Stilbite on Heulandite, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada – 5.8 cm

Analcime with Heulandite, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada
Analcime with Heulandite, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada – 3.5 cm

Stilbite with Analcime, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Stilbite with Analcime, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada – 7.2 cm

Analcime, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Analcime, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada – 6.1 cm

Stilbite, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Stilbite, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada
Field of view 4.0 cm

Natrolite with Stilbite, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Natrolite with Stilbite, Cape Split, Blomidon Peninsula, Kings Co., Nova Scotia, Canada
Field of view 6.5 cm

Posted by: Raymond McDougall on 10.18.2017 | Filed under: Latest, Recent Mineral Updates | Comments (0)

 

I’ve posted some great chabazite specimens from Wasson’s Bluff in this Nova Scotia Update (click here).

This is the classic Canadian locality for chabazite, including the deep-coloured ones that were once known as “acadialite”, and many of the specimens in this update are this colour (there are also very fine cabinet specimens of the nice mid-orange colour.) Acadialite was named after Acadia (which is the English for L’Acadie, the colonial-era name for this part of Canada). The name “acadialite” is sometimes still seen on older collection labels, sometimes as a species name and sometimes as a varietal name. Under current nomenclature, these specimens are known as chabazite, with “acadialite” now considered a historical synonym.

Chabazite, Wasson's Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Chabazite, Wasson’s Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada – 3.7 cm

Chabazite, Wasson's Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Chabazite, Wasson’s Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada – 9.6 cm

Chabazite, Wasson's Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Chabazite with Heaulandite, Wasson’s Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada – 2.8 cm

Chabazite, Wasson's Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Chabazite, Wasson’s Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada – 9.0 cm

Chabazite, Wasson's Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Chabazite, Wasson’s Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada – 5.4 cm

Chabazite, Wasson's Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Chabazite, Wasson’s Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada
Field of view 6 cm

Chabazite, Wasson's Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Chabazite, Wasson’s Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada – 5.3 cm

Chabazite, Wasson's Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Chabazite, Wasson’s Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada
Field of view 2.2 cm

Chabazite, Wasson's Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Chabazite, Wasson’s Bluff, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, Canada – 5.0 cm

Posted by: Raymond McDougall on 03.24.2017 | Filed under: Latest, Recent Mineral Updates | Comments (0)

I’ve added some excellent crystals in this new Alberta Selenite Update (click here). These specimens of gypsum, var. selenite were recovered during a project at Willow Creek, near Nanton, Alberta in the early 1990s. These crystals are sharp, lustrous and transparent – many are like crystal models.  And… they have great fluorescence.

Willow Creek selenite crystals are fluorescent under ultraviolet light, exhibiting an “hourglass” pattern that is not visible in natural light. It is clearly visible in short-wave, medium-wave and long-wave ultraviolet, most prominent in short-wave.

These crystals are also phosphorescent – the hourglass pattern remains briefly visible in a green hue in total darkness after the ultraviolet light source is extinguished – the selenite crystal then fades and until it too is dark.

Gypsum, var. selenite, Willow Creek, near Nanton, Alberta, Canada

Gypsum, var. selenite, Willow Creek, near Nanton, Alberta, Canada – 6.7 cm.

Gypsum var selenite, Willow Creek, Nanton, Alberta, ultraviolet light

Gypsum, var. selenite, Willow Creek, near Nanton, Alberta, Canada – 6.7 cm.
Same crystal as in the previous photo, exhibiting fluorescence,
photographed in short-wave ultraviolet light.

Gypsum, var. selenite, Willow Creek, near Nanton, Alberta, Canada

Gypsum, var. selenite, Willow Creek, near Nanton, Alberta, Canada – 7.2 cm

Gypsum, var. selenite, Willow Creek, near Nanton, Alberta, Canada

Gypsum, var. selenite, Willow Creek, near Nanton, Alberta, Canada – 6.5 cm

Gypsum, var. selenite, Willow Creek, near Nanton, Alberta, Canada

Gypsum, var. selenite, Willow Creek, near Nanton, Alberta, Canada – 6.2 cm

Gypsum, var. selenite, Willow Creek, near Nanton, Alberta, Canada

Gypsum, var. selenite, Willow Creek, near Nanton, Alberta, Canada – 6.2 cm.
Same crystal as in the previous photo, exhibiting fluorescence,
photographed in short-wave ultraviolet light.

Gypsum, var. selenite, Willow Creek, near Nanton, Alberta, Canada

Gypsum, var. selenite, Willow Creek, near Nanton, Alberta, Canada – 7.6 cm

Gypsum, var. selenite, Willow Creek, near Nanton, Alberta

Gypsum, var. selenite, Willow Creek, near Nanton, Alberta – 5.0 cm

Gypsum, var. selenite, Willow Creek, near Nanton, Alberta

Gypsum, var. selenite, Willow Creek, near Nanton, Alberta – 5.0 cm
Same crystal as in the previous photo, exhibiting fluorescence,
photographed in short-wave ultraviolet light.

Gypsum, var. selenite, Willow Creek, near Nanton, Alberta, Canada

Gypsum, var. selenite, Willow Creek, near Nanton, Alberta, Canada – 5.8 cm

Posted by: Raymond McDougall on 06.07.2016 | Filed under: Latest, Recent Mineral Updates | Comments (0)

 

I’ve added some great specimens in this Mont Saint-Hilaire Update (click here). One of the world’s great mineral localities, with over 400 species, the quarry has been closed to collecting since 2007 (with isolated exceptions that have not produced specimens in any quantity). The specimens in this update are from finds dated from 1988 to 2007.

One of the most remarkable aspects of collecting at Mont Saint-Hilaire is that no two occurrences are the same – the mineralized zones and pockets are each different, with varied mineral assemblages and crystal habits. This selection of specimens represents several different finds, each of which was unique.

Serandite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Serandite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 3.4 cm

Serandite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Serandite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 3.4 cm

Serandite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Serandite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 3.2 cm

Analcime pseudomorph after analcime, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Analcime pseudomorph after analcime, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 3.7 cm

Manganoneptunite on catapleiite pseudomorph after sodalite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Manganoneptunite on catapleiite pseudomorph after sodalite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada
Field of view 1.0 cm

Rhodochrosite (twinned), Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Rhodochrosite (twinned), Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 4.5 cm

Analcime on microcline, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Analcime on microcline, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 4.6 cm

Serandite with epidiymite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Serandite with epididymite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 7.3 cm

Sodalite, var. hackmanite, pink albite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Sodalite, var. hackmanite with pink albite coating, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 4.4 cm

Sodalite, var. hackmanite with pink albite coating, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Sodalite, var. hackmanite with albite coating, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 2.5 cm

Narsarsukite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Narsarsukite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 1.2 cm crystal

Leucophanite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Leucophanite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 2.4 cm

Analcime, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Analcime, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 3.6 cm

Rhodochrosite pseudomorph after serandite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Rhodochrosite pseudomorph after serandite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 3.3 cm

Quartz with albite and gaidonnayite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Quartz with albite and gaidonnayite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 6.3 cm

Quartz with albite and gaidonnayite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Quartz with albite and gaidonnayite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 4.2 cm

Quartz, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Quartz, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 3.2 cm

Elpidite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Elpidite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 3.2 cm

Elpidite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada

Elpidite, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada – 4.5 cm

Posted by: Raymond McDougall on 12.13.2015 | Filed under: Latest, Recent Mineral Updates | Comments (0)

 

I’ve added a new Howlite Update (click here) with beautiful sharp crystals of this mineral from the only locality to date that has produced crystals (other than a US locality with micros). It was a bit surprising for us to see these latest specimens, because in the past, finds have typically been sporadic. High quality specimens have always been hard to obtain and this seems unlikely to change in the long run. These specimens come from a relatively remote occurrence on Cape Breton Island (Nova Scotia) at the base of a small series of cliffs where the seawater pounds the enclosing anhydrite to reveal the delicate howlite crystals. I’ve added a small separate post on the blog with a few locality photos, should you like to see where they come from (click here).

Bras D'Or Lake, Iona, Victoria Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

 Howlite, Bras D’Or Lake, Iona, Victoria Co., Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada – 2.5 cm

Bras D'Or Lake, Iona, Victoria Co., Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada

Howlite, Bras D’Or Lake, Iona, Victoria Co., Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada
Crystal group 1.8 cm

Bras D'Or Lake, Iona, Victoria Co., Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada

Howlite, Bras D’Or Lake, Iona, Victoria Co., Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada
Crystal group 1.8 cm

Bras D'Or Lake, Iona, Victoria Co., Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada

Howlite, Bras D’Or Lake, Iona, Victoria Co., Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada
Crystal group 2.8 cm

Bras D'Or Lake, Iona, Victoria Co., Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada

Howlite, Bras D’Or Lake, Iona, Victoria Co., Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada – 4.7 cm

Howlite, Bras D'Or Lake, Iona, Victoria Co., Nova Scotia, Canada

Howlite, Bras D’Or Lake, Iona, Victoria Co., Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada – 4.2 cm

Howlite, Bras D'Or Lake, Iona, Victoria Co., Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada

Howlite, Bras D’Or Lake, Iona, Victoria Co., Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada
Crystal group 1.7 cm

Howlite, Bras D'Or Lake, Iona, Victoria Co., Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada

Howlite, Bras D’Or Lake, Iona, Victoria Co., Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada
Crystal group 2.8 cm, crystals slightly over 1 cm (!)

Howlite, Bras D'Or Lake, Iona, Victoria Co., Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada Howlite, Bras D’Or Lake, Iona, Victoria Co., Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada – 3.1 cm

Posted by: Raymond McDougall on 05.01.2015 | Filed under: Latest, Recent Mineral Updates | Comments (0)

 

For each mineral update on the website, I write a blog post and include a few of my favourite photos from the update.

However, because this week’s Thunder Bay Amethyst Update (click here) is special, it is accompanied by its own full post with lots of photographs of all kinds. (The special nature of this Thunder Bay Amethyst update is explained more fully in the “About These Amethysts” section of the individual specimen descriptions.)

So with the full post online, there’s no need for me to go overboard and post more amethyst photos here too. On the other hand I  just can’t help myself… and maybe you’re arriving at this page directly from a search engine… so here are a couple below. I hope you’ll have a chance to look at the  full length post/article about Thunder Bay Amethyst (click here) and I hope you enjoy both it and the beautiful specimens in the update.

Quartz var. Amethyst, Diamond Willow Mine, McTavish Twp., Thunder Bay District, OntarioQuartz var. Amethyst, Diamond Willow Mine, McTavish Twp., Thunder Bay District, Ontario – 9.4 cm

Quartz var. Amethyst, Diamond Willow Mine, McTavish Twp., Thunder Bay District, OntarioQuartz var. Amethyst, Diamond Willow Mine, McTavish Twp., Thunder Bay District, Ontario – 10.1 cm